Simplicity Dress – Delia Creates Copycat

When I saw Delia post about her

denim jacket and fall floral dress

I was in. love. And I’m a little bit of a copycat, so I from then onward searched for an opportunity to create my own version of her dress. Which turned out to be a LOT like hers. (Okay so maybe I’m a bit more than a little copycat.)

So here is her version:

And here is my version:

Kind of can see the resemblance, right?

You can read her full blog post HERE. (It’s amazing and I’m addicted to her site.)

We used different patterns, but it turned out to be semi similar.  (I was more than a bit pleased that they were so similar.)

I’m going to be going over the pros and cons of the pattern.

This is the pattern I used and can be found HERE.

Simplicity Pattern 8231 R5 Misses' Dress in Two Lengths by Sew House Seven, Size 14-16-18-20-22

Pros: 

  • The pattern is easy to follow
  • There are no darts (all the people said HALLELUJAH. No really)
  • It only requires elastic (not buttons, zippers, or complex stuff)
  • It looks like how I wanted it to look

Cons: 

  • I had no idea what casing and neck facing meant and it threw. me. off.
  • There is a pattern piece that never gets sewn into the dress (it is used to measure elastic)
  • Pattern pieces 1 and 2 didn’t fit perfectly together when laid perfectly flat

Overall, the pattern is very simple and easy to follow. There were some things that confused me, but now that I’ve gone through it and “know what I’m doing”, I really want to try sewing it again! This pattern is definitely going to be worth my ten dollars.

^ My face when my mother (hi mom!!!) told me what I was supposed to do with neck facing etc. ^ We may or may not have had to do some googling and youtubing.

Maybe I’m just a noobie seamstress (97% chance that I am) or maybe other people find those terms confusing as well. No? Okay.

When I make it again, I will lower the waistband, as there were some *ahem* issues regarding the casing and I had to rip some of it out, and I will make the skirt flare more into a CIRCLE SKIRT. Not quite because #hemming. But c’mon we all love to twirl around, right? I will never outgrow circle skirts. Maybe I’ll try to make the sleeves/neckline look less like a nurse outfit. :/ Hehe.

Happy sewing! Let me know if you try out the pattern and if certain things work/don’t work in the comments below! 🙂

 

 

DIY Cotton Decor

With fall coming (we wish, haha), who doesn’t want these gorgeous faux plants (that don’t actually look all that good, but somehow they do look good and improve the looks of your home) in your house?

For those with flower allergies, why not replace flowers with cotton? Sounds like a fair trade to me…

And so I present to you:

Supplies:

  • Pine cone
  • Twigs
  • Plant clippers (I really have no idea what they’re called) would be nice, but are not necessary
  • Cotton balls! (from your local store, or anywhere. They don’t need to be organic or gmo free or gluten free or anything like that.)
  • Hot glue gun + hot glue sticks (adult supervision required. Or you can be like me and burn the skin off your fingers – either is fine)
  • Vase (I prefer glass mugs/jars)

Instructions:

  1.  Gather thine supplies.
  2. Pull (or cut, if you have plant clippers/scissors) the pine cone’s seeds off the middle hunk. You can cut them in half if you want to/and if you have scissor thingys.
  3. Take a cotton ball and
    – pull at the fibers and kind of “floof” it
    -gently roll it into a ball again
    -put it to the side and repeat with the next cotton balls
  4. Plug in your hot glue gun. (It’s wise to set it on a piece of cardboard or paper, so that it doesn’t stick to the floor.)
  5. Wait for your hot glue gun to get hot. (It works better if it’s hot and not just warm.)
  6. Take your twigs and cotton balls to the hot glue gun.
  7. Glue the tip of the twig and stick the cotton ball on the tip of the stick, where the glue is.
  8. Repeat with remaining cotton balls.
  9. Gather your pine cone seeds.
  10. Put hot glue on the seeds and then stick them around the base of the cotton.
  11. Repeat, putting three or four seeds on each cotton ball. (Use your own judgment and decide what looks best.)
  12. Put your faux cotton plants in a vase or glass jar/mug!

And there you have it! You are done and now you can set your beautiful creation in your living room, dining room, kitchen or bathroom!

Don’t forget to pin this post in your “fall decoration” page!

Thanks for reading!

-Lizzie

DIY Kit Handbag with Zipper

I saw a zipper and I bought it. Probably not the best way to shop, but it was black and gold. How could I resist?

Pretty, right? (Yes, it’s definitely out of focus, and I definitely did that on purpose. Eheh.)

I have recently fallen in love with all things gold. (I used to be a silver-only snob, but have since grown up.) I love gold polka-dots, I love gold text on shirts, I love gold on zippers. So I bought myself a zipper. Because everyone needs 7 inch zippers lying around. With no project in mind.

But…

I did make something with it, just days after I bought it. So I think that justifies my purchase.

I present to you…*drum roll*

And I’ve decided to share the “how to” with you all.

The ingredients supplies you need are:

1. Fabric. (Doesn’t really matter how much – you can always adjust your zipper.) I had a little less than 1/8 of a yard. You can have more, you can have less. Not a huge deal. But remember, you need enough to make a small purse, and then you need enough to make another small purse. (Which will be the lining.)

2. A zipper. Get one to fit your fabric length. (I used a 7 inch and ended up taking off a small chunk.)

3. Sewing supplies. (Scissors, sewing machine, thread, the like.)

Now, how to make the Handbag.

Measure the zipper against the fabric. Is it too long? Too short?

Mine was too long.

To fix that you sew it up.

Grab your needle and thread (use a color of thread to match the fabric part of the zipper – I did black).

Annnd stick the needle close the the metal of the zipper and loop it around so it ends up looking like…

Tada! Tie of the end and snip the extra thread. Then you need to snip off the extra zipper.

And now it should fit your fabric. Setting your zipper aside for the time being…

Cut your fabric into squares (rectangles, doesn’t matter. Just whatever size you want your purse.)

So now you should have two pieces. (Four if you count the lining.)

Pin it! Gotta love pinning.

Annnnnnd sew it! I only had a fourth inch seam allowance, so there wouldn’t be a lot of excess fabric.

Tip: back stitch on the fabric when you’re first starting and finishing. That way you can just snip the ends and not have to bother with tying off the thread. (Saves you years.)

Now, do the same with the lining. (You want to have a slightly bigger seam allowance since it’s supposed to be smaller.)

Now you’re done with both! Yay! Snip off the extra fabric so you only have around a fourth inch all around.

Turn your first layer inside out. (Or outside out?)

Now you want to turn the raw “tops” down and press them with the iron. (Only do about a fourth inch.) Make sure you iron it well. You will thank yourself later.

After that’s done, you can stick the lining inside of the purse and it may look like…

Which is not okay. The lining is sticking out, but it’s not that big of a deal. Just take the lining back out, and then sew up the bottom a little bit more.

Now that you’ve sewn it up an extra bit, (a bit less than a fourth inch) you can trim off the extra.

Now stick it back inside of the purse.

Now it looks better.

Next, grab your zipper, *happy dance for zippers* unzip it, and wedge it in-between the two layers of fabric.

Make sense? Yes? Good. Then you want to pin it in place. Make sure you don’t pin/sew the lining too far up, otherwise it will interfere with the zipper zipping and it will cause problems.

My paint job is on point…just. kidding. But you get the point.

 

Then add your thingy mabobby.

That black thing. You don’t have to use something like that, I just had extra material so I decided to make use of it. (Tutorial for it coming soon!) Stick it into end of the purse like this.

After it’s pinned, baste stitch it as seen above. Baste stitching is very helpful because when you go to sew it, the pins will 1. not be there yay 2. not poke you and 3. just no. The stitching will keep it in place more precisely than the pins would.

Time to sew it! I started at the end, right in front of the zipper part of the zipper.

That part. ^ Make sense? Good.

You want the presser foot just touching the metal part of the zipper.

Sew all around until you get almost to the beginning.  Or if you can get past the mounds of fabric then kudos to you and I applaud. But I couldn’t. So I had to hand stitch the end because the zipper made it so thick.

See why I thought it was thick? Fabric + Zipper fabric + More fabric = Super thick and impossible to sew with the machine unless you want a broken needle.

Hand stitch it! Isn’t it so fun? Mhm thought so. (You might need a hard object to get it pushed through the layers. Try a thimble. Nice and safe ish.)

Once you’re done, tie it off, snip the thread and rip out the basting stitch. (I use black thread for the basting stitch just so I could see it easier and not mistake it for the actual stitching.)

It’s done! Woo hoo! You did it! I did it! We all did it! You can stick anything in it. Like your mending kit that doesn’t fit in your purse. (You can stick your mending kit in your car for those emergencies when you have a rip, or a button falls off, and you NEED it fixed RIGHT then.)

Thank you for checking out this post! I really hope I helped you in some way, or at least inspired you to get back into crafting. Remember, craft like your bank account doesn’t matter. 😉 Just kidding because eating food is also important for survival.

Don’t forget to pin this post!